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Abstract
Deep red soils, combining characteristics of highly weathered materials together with a significant degree of clay illuviation and with stony horizons close to the saprolite, are found in the Province of Misiones, northeastern Argentina. Two basic types of stony horizons have been found, which with the fine-grained material above are together considered autochthonous. The first one is a “ferruginous nodular horizon”, composed mainly of in situ goethitic [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorMorras, Hector
dc.contributor.authorMoretti, Lucas Martin
dc.contributor.authorPiccolo, Gabriel Agustin
dc.contributor.authorZech, Wolfgang H.
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T15:13:58Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T15:13:58Z
dc.date.issued2009-03
dc.identifier.issn1040-6182
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.quaint.2008.07.001
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1040618208002103
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/5502
dc.description.abstractDeep red soils, combining characteristics of highly weathered materials together with a significant degree of clay illuviation and with stony horizons close to the saprolite, are found in the Province of Misiones, northeastern Argentina. Two basic types of stony horizons have been found, which with the fine-grained material above are together considered autochthonous. The first one is a “ferruginous nodular horizon”, composed mainly of in situ goethitic nodules of gravel size resulting from weathering and glaebulization processes of basalt. The second are “siliceous horizons” which are also in situ, derived from pre-existing quartz veins within the basalt. In contrast, different analytical evidences, particularly the vertical and geographical variations in the SOM-stable carbon isotope ratios and the mineralogical composition of fine and coarse fractions, suggest that these red subtropical soils are polygenetic, being the result of a two-fold process linked to paleoecological fluctuations. In the framework of these results, different interpretations about the origin of these soils and their parent materials, and particularly the “tropical loess” theory, are discussed.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherElsevieres_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_AR
dc.sourceQuaternary International 196 (1–2) : 137-159 (March 2009)es_AR
dc.subjectGénesis del Sueloes_AR
dc.subjectSoil Genesiseng
dc.subjectTipos de Sueloses_AR
dc.subjectSoil Typeseng
dc.subjectSuelo Subtropicales_AR
dc.subjectSubtropical Soilseng
dc.subjectSuelo Pedregosoes_AR
dc.subjectStony Soilseng
dc.subjectHorizontes del Sueloes_AR
dc.subjectSoil Horizonseng
dc.subject.otherRegión Noreste, Argentinaes_AR
dc.titleGenesis of subtropical soils with stony horizons in NE Argentina: Autochthony and polygenesises_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenInstituto de Sueloses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Morras, Hector. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Suelos; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Moretti, Lucas Martin. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Suelos; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Piccolo, Gabriel Agustin. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Cerro Azul; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Zech, Wolfgang H. University of Bayreuth. Institute of Soil Science and Soil Geography; Alemaniaes_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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