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Abstract
The present study evaluates the effect of food processing on the antigenicity of pecan proteins as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, proteomic tools were used to identify potential pecan markers suitable for confirming the presence of pecan proteins in food and validating new methods developed to detect traces of the commodity. To assess the effects of processing on protein stability and antigenicity, pecan nuts were [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorPolenta, Gustavo Alberto
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Dorcas
dc.contributor.authorGodefroy Benrejeb, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-09T18:22:01Z
dc.date.available2019-05-09T18:22:01Z
dc.date.issued2011-05-19
dc.identifier.issn1936-9751
dc.identifier.issn1936-976X (Online)
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1007/s12161-011-9255-8
dc.identifier.urihttps://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12161-011-9255-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/5085
dc.description.abstractThe present study evaluates the effect of food processing on the antigenicity of pecan proteins as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, proteomic tools were used to identify potential pecan markers suitable for confirming the presence of pecan proteins in food and validating new methods developed to detect traces of the commodity. To assess the effects of processing on protein stability and antigenicity, pecan nuts were submitted to heat treatments and extracts were analysed by ELISA, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot. The ELISA method was able to detect pecan traces even after submitting the commodity to rigorous treatments, though these treatments affected the detectability to varying degrees. Proteomic assessment showed that the majority of pecan proteins were matched by homology to walnut proteins, which are more abundantly populated in the protein sequence databases. However, there were a few important exceptions: 7S vicilin, 11S legumin and putative allergen I1, unambiguously identified as pecan in origin. Interestingly, putative allergen I1 offered unique analytical advantages to be used as a pecan marker for validation and confirmation purposes.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesseng
dc.sourceFood analytical methods 5 (2) : 216–225. (April 2012)es_AR
dc.subjectPecanes_AR
dc.subjectPecanaeng
dc.subjectAllergenseng
dc.subjectAlérgenoses_AR
dc.subject.otherEffect of Processingeng
dc.subject.otherPecan Proteinseng
dc.subject.otherImmunological Toolseng
dc.subject.otherProteomic Toolseng
dc.subject.otherFood Allergens Detectioneng
dc.titleEffect of processing on the detectability of pecan proteins assessed by immunological and proteomic toolses_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleeng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersioneng
dc.description.filFil: Polenta, Gustavo Alberto. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Tecnología de Alimentos; Argentina.es_AR
dc.description.filFil: Weber, Dorcas. Health Canada. Bureau of Chemical Safety; Canada.es_AR
dc.description.filFil: Godefroy Benrejeb, Samuel. Health Canada. Bureau of Chemical Safety; Canada.es_AR
dc.description.filFil: Abbott, Michael. Health Canada. Bureau of Chemical Safety; Canada.es_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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