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Background: Control of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) currently depends on serological diagnosis of infected equids. However, recently infected equids may not produce detectable anti-EIAV antibodies up to 157 days post infection and so present a high transmission risk. Therefore, direct nucleic acid detection methods are urgently needed to improve EIAV surveillance and management programs in counties where the disease is endemic. Objectives: To [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorCook, R.F.
dc.contributor.authorBarrandeguy, Maria Edith
dc.contributor.authorLee, Pei-Yu Alison
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Chuan-Fu
dc.contributor.authorShen, Yu-Han
dc.contributor.authorTsai, Yun-Long
dc.contributor.authorChang, Hsiao-Fen G.
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hwa-Tang Thomas
dc.contributor.authorBalasuriya, Udeni B.R.
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-21T15:49:47Z
dc.date.available2019-02-21T15:49:47Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0425-1644
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1111/evj.13032
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/4481
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/evj.13032
dc.description.abstractBackground: Control of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) currently depends on serological diagnosis of infected equids. However, recently infected equids may not produce detectable anti-EIAV antibodies up to 157 days post infection and so present a high transmission risk. Therefore, direct nucleic acid detection methods are urgently needed to improve EIAV surveillance and management programs in counties where the disease is endemic. Objectives: To evaluate a field-deployable, reverse transcription-insulated isothermal PCR (RT-iiPCR) assay targeting the conserved 50 untranslated region (50 UTR)/exon 1 of the tat gene of EIAV. Study design: The analytical and clinical performance of the newly developed EIAV RT-iiPCR was evaluated by comparison with a EIAV real-time RTPCR (RT-qPCR) along with the AGID test. Methods: Analytical sensitivity was determined using in vitro transcribed RNA containing the target area of the 50 UTR/tat gene and samples from two EIAV-positive horses. Specificity was verified using nine common equine viruses. Clinical performance was evaluated by comparison with EIAV RT-qPCR and AGID using samples derived from 196 inapparent EIAV carrier horses. Results: EIAV RT-iiPCR did not react with other commonly encountered equine viruses and had equivalent sensitivity (95% detection limit of eight genome equivalents), with a concordance of 95.41% to conventional EIAV RT-qPCR. However, the RT-qPCR and RT-iiPCR had sensitivities of 43.75 and 50.00%, respectively, when compared to the AGID test. Main limitations: Low viral loads commonly encountered in inapparent EIAV carriers may limit the diagnostic sensitivity of RT-PCR-based tests. Conclusions: Although EIAV RT-iiPCR is not sufficiently sensitive to replace the current AGID test, it can augment control efforts by identifying recently exposed or “serologically silent” equids, particularly as the latter often represent a significant transmission risk because of high viral loads. Furthermore, the relatively low cost and field-deployable design enable utilisation of EIAV RT-iiPCR even in remote regions.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWileyeng
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesseng
dc.sourceEquine veterinary journal (24 October 2018)eng
dc.subjectCaballoses_AR
dc.subjectHorseseng
dc.subjectEquine Infectious Anaemiaeng
dc.subjectDiagnosiseng
dc.subjectDiagnósticoeng
dc.subjectAnemia Infecciosa Equinaeng
dc.subjectPCReng
dc.subjectVirus de los Animaleses_AR
dc.subjectAnimal Viruseseng
dc.subject.otherEquinoses_AR
dc.subject.otherInsulated Isothermal RT-PCReng
dc.subject.otherPoint-of-Need Testingeng
dc.titleRapid detection of equine infectious anaemia virus nucleic acid by insulated isothermal RT-PCR assay to aid diagnosis under field conditionses_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleeng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersioneng
dc.description.origenInstituto de Virologíaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Cook, R.F. Louisiana State University. School of Veterinary Medicine. Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Pathobiological Sciences; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Barrandeguy, Maria Edith. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Virología; Argentina. Universidad del Salvador. Escuela de Veterinaria. Cátedra de Enfermedades Infecciosas; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Lee, Pei-Yu Alison. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Tsai, Chuan-Fu. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Shen, Yu-Han. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Tsai, Yun-Long. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Chang, Hsiao-Fen G. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas. GeneReach USA, Lexington; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Balasuriya, Udeni B.R. Louisiana State University. School of Veterinary Medicine. Louisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory and Department of Pathobiological Sciences; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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