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This study assessed the use of pasture attributes to control daily intake and diet quality during progressive defoliation on pastures of Axonopus catarinensis. Three consecutive 12‐day grazing treatments of progressive defoliation were conducted with Brahman cross‐steers. Daily forage intake and defoliation dynamics were assessed using a pasture‐based method. The treatments differed in initial sward height (33, 44 and 61 cm) and herbage mass (1030, 1740 [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorBenvenutti, Marcelo A.
dc.contributor.authorPavetti, Daniel Rolando
dc.contributor.authorPoppi, Dennis P.
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Iain J.
dc.contributor.authorCangiano, Carlos Alberto
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-30T12:45:27Z
dc.date.available2018-07-30T12:45:27Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.issn1365-2494
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1111/gfs.12186
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/2911
dc.identifier.urihttps://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/gfs.12186
dc.description.abstractThis study assessed the use of pasture attributes to control daily intake and diet quality during progressive defoliation on pastures of Axonopus catarinensis. Three consecutive 12‐day grazing treatments of progressive defoliation were conducted with Brahman cross‐steers. Daily forage intake and defoliation dynamics were assessed using a pasture‐based method. The treatments differed in initial sward height (33, 44 and 61 cm) and herbage mass (1030, 1740 and 2240 kg ha−1). The post‐grazing residual sward height, at which forage intake decreased, appeared to increase with the initial sward height (12·3, 14·6 and 15·5 cm). Steers grazed up to four distinctive grazing strata in all treatments. The depth and herbage mass content of the top grazing stratum were at least five times higher than the lower grazing strata in all treatments. This explains why forage intake decreased when the top grazing stratum was removed in approximately 93% of the pasture area in all treatments, equivalent to approximately 7% of the pasture area remaining ungrazed. We conclude that the residual ungrazed area of the pasture, rather than residual sward height, can be used to develop grazing management strategies to control forage intake and diet quality in a wide range of pasture conditions.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfeng
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesseng
dc.sourceGrass and forage science 71 (3) : 424-436. (September 2016)eng
dc.subjectDefoliaciónes_AR
dc.subjectManejo de Praderases_AR
dc.subjectDietaes_AR
dc.subjectSistemas de Pastoreoes_AR
dc.subjectGanado Bovinoes_AR
dc.subjectCattleeng
dc.subjectGrazing Systemseng
dc.subjectDieteng
dc.subjectGrassland Managementeng
dc.subjectDefoliationeng
dc.subject.otherAxonopus Catarinensises_AR
dc.titleDefoliation patterns and their implications for the management of vegetative tropical pastures to control intake and diet quality by cattleeng
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleeng
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersioneng
dc.description.origenEEA Cerro Azules_AR
dc.description.filFil: Benvenutti, Marcelo A. University of Queensland Gayndah; Australiaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Pavetti, Daniel Rolando. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Cerro Azul; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Poppi, Dennis P. University of Queensland Gayndah; Australiaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Gordon, Iain J. James Hutton Institute; Gran Bretañaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Cangiano, Carlos Alberto. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Cerro Azul; Argentinaes_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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