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Abstract
Host associated microbiome not only may affect the individual health-status or provide insights into the species- or group specific bacterial communities but may act as early warning signs in the assessment of zoonotic reservoirs, offering clues to predict, prevent and control possible episodes of emerging zoonoses. Bats may be carriers and reservoirs of multiple pathogens such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, showing in the same time robust immunity [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorCorduneanu, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorMihalca, Andrei Daniel
dc.contributor.authorSandor, Attila D.
dc.contributor.authorHornok, Sándor
dc.contributor.authorMalmberg, Maja
dc.contributor.authorPin Viso, Natalia Daniela
dc.contributor.authorBongcam-Rudloff, Erik
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-22T16:47:54Z
dc.date.available2021-04-22T16:47:54Z
dc.date.issued2021-04
dc.identifier.issn1878-1667
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.cimid.2020.101605
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/9160
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0147957120301946
dc.description.abstractHost associated microbiome not only may affect the individual health-status or provide insights into the species- or group specific bacterial communities but may act as early warning signs in the assessment of zoonotic reservoirs, offering clues to predict, prevent and control possible episodes of emerging zoonoses. Bats may be carriers and reservoirs of multiple pathogens such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, showing in the same time robust immunity against many of them. The microbiota plays a fundamental role on the induction, training and function of the host immune system and the immune system has largely evolved in order to maintain the symbiotic relationship of the host with these diverse microbes. Thus, expanding our knowledge on bat-associated microbiome it can be usefully in understanding bats’ outstanding immune capacities. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of different bacterial communities in heart tissue of insectivorous bats, Nyctalus noctula, Pipistrellus pipistrellus and Rhinoplophus hipposideros, from Central and Eastern Europe using high-throughput sequencing of variable regions of the 16S rRNA. In addition, species-specific PCRs were used to validate the presence of the vector-borne pathogens Bartonella spp. and Rickettsia spp. In this study we identified a wide variety of bacterial groups, with the most abundant phyla being Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. The results showed that at individual level, the year or location had no effect on the diversity and composition of the microbiome, however host species determined both structure and abundance of the bacterial community. We report the presence of vector-borne bacteria Bartonella spp. in samples of N. noctula and indications of Rickettsia spp. in R. hipposideros. Our results provide a first insight into the bacterial community found in heart tissue of bats from Central and South Eastern Europe.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherElsevieres_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_AR
dc.sourceComparative Immunology, Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 75 : 101605 (Abril 2021)es_AR
dc.subjectBacteriaes_AR
dc.subjectChiropteraes_AR
dc.subjectZoonoseseng
dc.subjectZoonosises_AR
dc.subjectParasiteseng
dc.subjectParásitoses_AR
dc.subjectMicrobiologyeng
dc.subjectMicrobiologíaes_AR
dc.subjectEuropeeng
dc.subjectEuropaes_AR
dc.subjectBartonellaes_AR
dc.subjectRickettsiaes_AR
dc.subject.otherNyctalus noctulaes_AR
dc.subject.otherPipistrellus pipistrelluses_AR
dc.subject.otherRhinoplophus hipposideroses_AR
dc.titleThe heart microbiome of insectivorous bats from Central and South Eastern Europees_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenInstituto de Biotecnologíaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Corduneanu, Alexandra. University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Cluj-Napoca. Department of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases; Rumaniaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Mihalca, Andrei Daniel. University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Cluj-Napoca. Department of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases; Rumaniaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Sandor, Attila D. University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine of Cluj-Napoca. Department of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases; Rumaniaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Sandor, Attila D. University of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Parasitology and Zoology; Hungríaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Hornok, Sándor. University of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Parasitology and Zoology; Hungríaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Malmberg, Maja. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Biomedical Sciences and Veterinary Public Health. Section of Virology; Sueciaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Malmberg, Maja. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics. SLU Global Bioinformatics Centre; Sueciaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Pin Viso, Natalia Daniela. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Agrobiotecnología y Biología Molecular; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Pin Viso, Natalia Daniela. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics. SLU Global Bioinformatics Centre; Sueciaes_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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