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Abstract
Background: Loss of virulence is a phenotypic adaptation commonly seen in prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens. This mechanism is not well studied, especially in organisms with multiple host and life cycle stages such as Babesia, a tick-transmitted hemoparasite of humans and animals. B. bovis, which infects cattle, has naturally occurring virulent strains that can be reliably attenuated in vivo. Previous studies suggest the virulence loss mechanism may [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorPedroni, Monica J.
dc.contributor.authorSondgeroth, Kerry S.
dc.contributor.authorGallego-Lopez, Gina M.
dc.contributor.authorEchaide, Ignacio Eduardo
dc.contributor.authorLau, Audrey OT
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-14T16:08:06Z
dc.date.available2018-09-14T16:08:06Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.issn1471-2164
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2164-14-763
dc.identifier.urihttps://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2164-14-763
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/3367
dc.description.abstractBackground: Loss of virulence is a phenotypic adaptation commonly seen in prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens. This mechanism is not well studied, especially in organisms with multiple host and life cycle stages such as Babesia, a tick-transmitted hemoparasite of humans and animals. B. bovis, which infects cattle, has naturally occurring virulent strains that can be reliably attenuated in vivo. Previous studies suggest the virulence loss mechanism may involve post-genomic modification. We investigated the transcriptome profiles of two geographically distinct B. bovis virulent and attenuated strain pairs to better understand virulence loss and to gain insight into pathogen adaptation strategies. Results: Expression microarray and RNA-sequencing approaches were employed to compare transcriptome profiles of two B. bovis strain pairs, with each pair consisting of a virulent parental and its attenuated derivative strain. Differentially regulated transcripts were identified within each strain pair. These included genes encoding for VESA1, SmORFs, undefined membrane and hypothetical proteins. The majority of individual specific gene transcripts differentially regulated within a strain were not shared between the two strains. There was a disproportionately greater number of ves genes upregulated in the virulent parental strains. When compared with their attenuated derivatives, divergently oriented ves genes were included among the upregulated ves genes in the virulent strains, while none of the upregulated ves genes in the attenuated derivatives were oriented head to head. One gene family whose specific members were consistently and significantly upregulated in expression in both attenuated strains was spherical body protein (SBP) 2 encoding gene where SBP2 truncated copies 7, 9 and 11 transcripts were all upregulated. Conclusions: We conclude that ves heterodimer pair upregulation and overall higher frequency of ves gene expressions in the virulent strains is consistent with the involvement of this gene family in virulence. This is logical given the role of VESA1 proteins in cytoadherence of infected cells to endothelial cells. However, upregulation of some ves genes in the attenuated derivatives suggests that the consequence of upregulation is gene-specific. Furthermore, upregulation of the spherical body protein 2 gene family may play a role in the attenuated phenotype. Exactly how these two gene families may contribute to the loss or gain of virulence is discussed.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_AR
dc.sourceBMC Genomics 14 : 763 (2013)es_AR
dc.subjectBabesia bovises_AR
dc.subjectGenéticaes_AR
dc.subjectGeneticseng
dc.subjectVacuna Vivaes_AR
dc.subjectLive Vaccineseng
dc.subjectExpresión Génicaes_AR
dc.subjectGene Expressioneng
dc.subjectSecuencia Nucleotídicaes_AR
dc.subjectNucleotide Sequenceeng
dc.subject.otherVacuna Atenuadaes_AR
dc.titleComparative transcriptome analysis of geographically distinct virulent and attenuated Babesia bovis strains reveals similar gene expression changes through attenuationes_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenEEA Rafaelaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Pedroni, Monica J. Washington State University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology. Program of Genomics; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Sondgeroth, Kerry S. Washington State University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology. Program of Genomics; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Gallego-Lopez, Gina M. Washington State University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology. Program of Genomics; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Rafaela. Laboratorio de Inmunología y Parasitología; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Lau, Audrey OT. Washington State University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology. Program of Genomics; Estados Unidos. Washington State University. College of Veterinary Medicine. Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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