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Abstract
The development of high-yielding crops with drought tolerance is necessary to increase food, feed, fiber and fuel production. Methods that create similar environmental conditions for a large number of genotypes are essential to investigate plant responses to drought in gene discovery studies. Modern facilities that control water availability for each plant remain cost-prohibited to some sections of the research community. We present an alternative [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorOrtiz, Diego
dc.contributor.authorLitvin, Alexander G.
dc.contributor.authorSalas Fernandez, Marìa G.
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-29T13:31:37Z
dc.date.available2018-06-29T13:31:37Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-05
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0198546
dc.identifier.urihttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article/authors?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0198546
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/2697
dc.description.abstractThe development of high-yielding crops with drought tolerance is necessary to increase food, feed, fiber and fuel production. Methods that create similar environmental conditions for a large number of genotypes are essential to investigate plant responses to drought in gene discovery studies. Modern facilities that control water availability for each plant remain cost-prohibited to some sections of the research community. We present an alternative cost-effective automated irrigation system scalable for a high-throughput and controlled dry-down treatment of plants. This system was tested in sorghum using two experiments. First, four genotypes were subjected to ten days of dry-down to achieve three final Volumetric Water Content (VWC) levels: drought (0.10 and 0.20 m3 m-3) and control (0.30 m3 m-3). The final average VWC was 0.11, 0.22, and 0.31 m3 m-3, respectively, and significant differences in biomass accumulation were observed between control and drought treatments. Second, 42 diverse sorghum genotypes were subjected to a seven-day dry-down treatment for a final drought stress of 0.15 m3 m-3 VWC. The final average VWC was 0.17 m3 m-3, and plants presented significant differences in photosynthetic rate during the drought period. These results demonstrate that cost-effective automation systems can successfully control substrate water content for each plant, to accurately compare their phenotypic responses to drought, and be scaled up for high-throughput phenotyping studies.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.relationinfo:eu-repograntAgreement/INTA/PNCYO/1127043/AR./Desarrollo de germoplasma y cultivares comerciales de cereales de verano.es_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_AR
dc.sourcePLoS ONE 13 (6) : e0198546 (2018)es_AR
dc.subjectSorghumes_AR
dc.subjectSorgoes_AR
dc.subjectSequíaes_AR
dc.subjectDroughteng
dc.subjectFenotiposes_AR
dc.subjectPhenotypeseng
dc.subjectRiego Automáticoes_AR
dc.subjectAutomatic Irrigationeng
dc.titleA cost-effective and customizable automated irrigation system for precise high-throughput phenotyping in drought stress studieses_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenEEA Manfredies_AR
dc.description.filFil: Ortìz, Diego. Iowa State University. Departament of Agronomy; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Litvin, Alexander G. Iowa State University. Departament of Horticulture; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Salas Fernandez, Marìa G. Iowa State University. Departament of Horticulture; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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