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Abstract
The use of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for virus diagnostics, as well as the importance of this technology as a valuable tool for discovery of novel viruses has been extensively investigated. In this review, we consider the application of HTS approaches to uncover novel plant viruses with a focus on the negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virosphere. Plant viruses with negative-sense and ambisense RNA (NSR) genomes belong to several taxonomic [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorBejerman, Nicolas Esteban
dc.contributor.authorDebat, Humberto Julio
dc.contributor.authorDietzgen, Ralf G
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-01T16:16:09Z
dc.date.available2020-12-01T16:16:09Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-16
dc.identifier.issn1664-302X
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2020.588427
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2020.588427/full
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/8354
dc.description.abstractThe use of high-throughput sequencing (HTS) for virus diagnostics, as well as the importance of this technology as a valuable tool for discovery of novel viruses has been extensively investigated. In this review, we consider the application of HTS approaches to uncover novel plant viruses with a focus on the negative-sense, single-stranded RNA virosphere. Plant viruses with negative-sense and ambisense RNA (NSR) genomes belong to several taxonomic families, including Rhabdoviridae, Aspiviridae, Fimoviridae, Tospoviridae, and Phenuiviridae. They include both emergent pathogens that infect a wide range of plant species, and potential endophytes which appear not to induce any visible symptoms. As a consequence of biased sampling based on a narrow focus on crops with disease symptoms, the number of NSR plant viruses identified so far represents only a fraction of this type of viruses present in the virosphere. Detection and molecular characterization of NSR viruses has often been challenging, but the widespread implementation of HTS has facilitated not only the identification but also the characterization of the genomic sequences of at least 70 NSR plant viruses in the last 7 years. Moreover, continuing advances in HTS technologies and bioinformatic pipelines, concomitant with a significant cost reduction has led to its use as a routine method of choice, supporting the foundations of a diverse array of novel applications such as quarantine analysis of traded plant materials and genetic resources, virus detection in insect vectors, analysis of virus communities in individual plants, and assessment of virus evolution through ecogenomics, among others. The insights from these advancements are shedding new light on the extensive diversity of NSR plant viruses and their complex evolution, and provide an essential framework for improved taxonomic classification of plant NSR viruses as part of the realm Riboviria. Thus, HTS-based methods for virus discovery, our ‘new eyes,’ are unraveling in real time the richness and magnitude of the plant RNA virosphere.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaes_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_AR
dc.sourceFrontiers in Microbiology 11: 588427 (2020)es_AR
dc.subjectHTSes_AR
dc.subjectPlant Viruseseng
dc.subjectVirus De Las Plantases_AR
dc.subject.otherVirus Discoveryeng
dc.subject.otherPlant NSR Viruseseng
dc.subject.otherVirosphereeng
dc.subject.otherBioinformacticses_AR
dc.titleThe Plant Negative-Sense RNA Virosphere: Virus Discovery Through New Eyeses_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenInstituto de Patología Vegetales_AR
dc.description.filFil: Bejerman, Nicolas Esteban. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Patología Vegetal; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Unidad de Fitopatología y Modelización Agrícola (UFYMA); Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Debat, Humberto Julio. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Patología Vegetal; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Unidad de Fitopatología y Modelización Agrícola (UFYMA); Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Dietzgen, Ralf G. University of Queensland. Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation; Australiaes_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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