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Abstract
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key component of soil microbiota in natural and anthropogenic ecosystems. Even though soil type and climate conditioned land uses in the past, soybean cultivation has overrode such limitations and replaced the earlier diverse agro- and natural ecosystems in many countries of South America. We investigated whether actual diversity patterns of local AMF communities were determined by previous land uses and their [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorFaggioli, Valeria Soledad
dc.contributor.authorCabello, Marta Noemí
dc.contributor.authorGrilli, Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorVasar, Martti
dc.contributor.authorCovacevich, Fernanda
dc.contributor.authorÖpik, Maarja
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T12:21:13Z
dc.date.available2019-05-21T12:21:13Z
dc.date.issued2019-01
dc.identifier.issn0167-8809
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2018.10.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/5170
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880918304250
dc.description.abstractArbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are a key component of soil microbiota in natural and anthropogenic ecosystems. Even though soil type and climate conditioned land uses in the past, soybean cultivation has overrode such limitations and replaced the earlier diverse agro- and natural ecosystems in many countries of South America. We investigated whether actual diversity patterns of local AMF communities were determined by previous land uses and their intrinsic environmental conditions. We sequenced AMF DNA from root and soil samples collected from current soybean fields with three historical land use situations (HLU): agricultural fields, livestock farming and forest sites. We detected overall high AMF richness: 87 virtual taxa (VT) in soil and 69 VT in soybean roots. Mean number of VT per sample ranged from 8.1 to 19.2; it was not affected by HLU nor type of sample, but correlated with soil texture, pH, and plant density. Conversely, AMF community composition did significantly diverge among HLU and type of sample. A distinctive community composition was observed in roots of historical agricultural fields which differed from any other soil and root sample evaluated in this study. We attribute this finding to variations in the abundance pattern of predominant AMF taxa (Glomeraceae and Gigasporaceae). Our results indicate that soybean cultivation supports relatively high AMF diversity, with apparent legacies from earlier management and natural habitats in the composition of resident AMF communities.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherElsevieres_AR
dc.relationinfo:eu-repograntAgreement/INTA/PNCYO-1127033/AR./Manejo nutricional de cereales y oleaginosas para la intensificación sustentable de los sistemas productivos
dc.relationinfo:eu-repograntAgreement/INTA/PNSUELO-1134043/AR./Caracterización y funcionalidad de la biota del suelo.
dc.relationinfo:eu-repograntAgreement/INTA/REDAE-1136021/AR./RED DE AGROECOLOGIA
dc.relationinfo:eu-repograntAgreement/INTA/REDGEN-1137041/AR./PLAN DE GESTIÓN RED RECURSOS GENETICOS MICROBIANOS
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_AR
dc.sourceAgriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 269 : 174-182 (January 2019)es_AR
dc.subjectMicorrizas Arbusculareses_AR
dc.subjectArbuscular Mycorrhizaeng
dc.subjectHongoses_AR
dc.subjectFungieng
dc.subjectBiodiversidades_AR
dc.subjectBiodiversityeng
dc.subjectOrganismos Transmitidos por Sueloes_AR
dc.subjectSoilborne Organismseng
dc.subjectSojaes_AR
dc.subjectSoybeanseng
dc.subjectUtilización de la Tierraes_AR
dc.subjectLand Useeng
dc.subjectcientifico
dc.titleRoot colonizing and soil borne communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi differ among soybean fields with contrasting historical land usees_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenEEA Marcos Juárezes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Faggioli, Valeria Soledad. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Marcos Juárez; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Cabello, Marta Noemí. Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo. Instituto de Botánica Spegazzini; Argentina. Comisión de Investigaciones Científicas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Grilli, Gabriel. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Córdoba. Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. Facultad de Ciencias Exactas Físicas y Naturales. Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Vegetal; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Vasar, Martti. University of Tartu. Department of Botany; Estoniaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Covacevich, Fernanda. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Mar del Plata. Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Biotecnología; Argentina. Fundación para Investigaciones Biológicas Aplicadas; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Öpik, Maarja. University of Tartu. Department of Botany; Estoniaes_AR


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