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Abstract
Maize (Zea Mays L.) grain yield have increased during the last decades and there is an ample range of rates of grain yield increments reported in the literature. Maize hybrids comparison at their optimum plant density might contribute to elucidate the yield potential increments during the last decades. In addition, high plant density testing and multi-location trials in modern breeding programs might have contributed to greater stress tolerance in modern [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorDi Matteo, Javier. A
dc.contributor.authorFerreyra, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorCerrudo, Aníbal Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorEcharte, Laura
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Fernando Hector
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-25T13:59:23Z
dc.date.available2019-04-25T13:59:23Z
dc.date.issued2016-10
dc.identifier.issn0378-4290
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.fcr.2016.07.023
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378429016302349
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/4983
dc.description.abstractMaize (Zea Mays L.) grain yield have increased during the last decades and there is an ample range of rates of grain yield increments reported in the literature. Maize hybrids comparison at their optimum plant density might contribute to elucidate the yield potential increments during the last decades. In addition, high plant density testing and multi-location trials in modern breeding programs might have contributed to greater stress tolerance in modern hybrids. Then, a close relationship between tolerance to high plant density and yield stability in hybrids released in different decades is expected. The objectives of this study were (i) to determine the optimum plant density and the gain in yield potential and its components, and (ii) to test the hypothesis that tolerance to high plant densities and yield stability are strongly associated, for Argentinean maize hybrids released between 1965 and 2010. One set of experiments was conducted at Balcarce, Argentina during five growing seasons (Exps. 1–5), each experiment included a combination of plant densities (1.5–20 plants m−2) and hybrids released in different years (1965–2010). Data from these experiments were used to estimate optimum plant density, gains in yield potential and tolerance to high plant density. Another experiment (Exp. 6) included 18 trials conducted in a wide range of environments and data from these trials were used to estimate yield stability. The optimum density to attain the maximum yield ranged from 9.7 to 16.4 pl m−2 and it did not present a clear trend with the year of hybrid release. Yield potential increased at a rate of 0.83% or 107 kg ha−1 year−1 (p < 0.001) and yield increments were attributed mainly to gains in kernel number per unit area and to biomass production steady increments during the 1965–2010 period. Harvest index contributions to yield increments were important for the period 1980–1993, but HI remained stable during the last two decades. Yield stability increased with the year of hybrid release, in accordance with higher mean yields and lower CV (coefficient of variation) across environments of modern compared with older hybrids. Tolerance to high plant densities increased during the last 45 years and it was direct and significantly associated with yield stability, providing strong bases for the use of high plant densities as a method to attain gains in yield stability.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherElsevieres_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_AR
dc.sourceField Crops Research 197 : 107-116 (October 2016)es_AR
dc.subjectMaízes_AR
dc.subjectMaizeeng
dc.subjectRendimientoes_AR
dc.subjectYieldseng
dc.subjectHíbridoses_AR
dc.subjectHybridseng
dc.subjectCaracteres de Rendimientoes_AR
dc.subjectYield Componentseng
dc.subjectFitomejoramientoes_AR
dc.subjectPlant Breedingeng
dc.titleYield potential and yield stability of Argentine maize hybrids over 45 years of breedinges_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenEEA Balcarcees_AR
dc.description.filFil: Di Matteo, Javier Antonio. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce. Unidad Integrada Balcarce. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias; Argentina. University of Guelph. Department of Plant Agriculture; Canadáes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Ferreyra, J. M.. Monsanto; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Cerrudo, Aníbal Alejandro. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce. Unidad Integrada Balcarce. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Echarte, Laura. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce; Argentina.Unidad Integrada Balcarce. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias; Argentina Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Fil: Andrade, Fernando Hector. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Balcarce; Argentina.Unidad Integrada Balcarce. Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata. Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias; Argentina Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentinaes_AR
dc.subtypecientifico
dc.subtypeArgentina


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