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Abstract
Cattle were first introduced to the Western Hemisphere in 1493 and by subsequent introductions from the Iberian Peninsula, providing the genetic background of the American Criollo cattle, with influences from Spanish, Portuguese and African breeds. Criollo's high adaptive capacity enabled them to spread and colonize a wide variety of environments. Their ancestry combined with local adaptations created the wide spectrum of American Criollo breeds that we [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Eileen
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez Almeida, Felipe A.
dc.contributor.authorMcIntosh, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorPoli, Mario Andres
dc.contributor.authorCibils, Andrés Francisco
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Quintana, José Alfredo
dc.contributor.authorFélix-Portillo, Monserrath
dc.contributor.authorEstell, Richard E.
dc.date.accessioned2022-04-28T11:52:51Z
dc.date.available2022-04-28T11:52:51Z
dc.date.issued2022-05
dc.identifier.issn1095-922X
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2022.104722
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/11753
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0140196322000179
dc.description.abstractCattle were first introduced to the Western Hemisphere in 1493 and by subsequent introductions from the Iberian Peninsula, providing the genetic background of the American Criollo cattle, with influences from Spanish, Portuguese and African breeds. Criollo's high adaptive capacity enabled them to spread and colonize a wide variety of environments. Their ancestry combined with local adaptations created the wide spectrum of American Criollo breeds that we see today, many currently at risk of extinction. We review the existing genetic and production data on the Argentinian, Mexican, Uruguayan and US Creole cattle that form the basis of the current and future research described in this special issue. In these countries, Criollo cattle became the basis of the livestock industry for the supply of meat, hides and animal work, until they were displaced by more specialized European and cebuine type cattle breeds at the end of the 19th century. Since then, Criollo herds remained mostly in marginal regions unsuitable for commercial breeds. Efforts by local producers and research institutions helped to preserve Criollo populations. Several studies have demonstrated that these animals can produce high quality meat and are more resistant to diseases, and emphasize their high fertility, calving ease, longevity and ability to adapt to harsh environments. Mexican Criollos have high genetic diversity but lack strong conservation programs. More detailed genetic characterization within each regional Criollo population is needed to establish appropriate conservation strategies. In US, Texas Longhorn cattle are closely related to Mexican Criollos, while Pineywoods show a stronger relationship with Iberian breeds. Variable levels of genetic diversity were found among all North American Criollos, probably due to crossbreeding. Criollos from Argentina and Uruguay showed clear divergence due to genetic isolation but clustered together, representing the southernmost expansion of bovine cattle in the Americas.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherElsevieres_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccesses_AR
dc.sourceJournal of Arid Environments 200 : 104722 (Mayo 2022)es_AR
dc.subjectCattleeng
dc.subjectGanado Bovinoes_AR
dc.subjectGeneticseng
dc.subjectGenéticaes_AR
dc.subjectArgentinaes_AR
dc.subjectMexicoeng
dc.subjectMéxicoe
dc.subjectUruguayes_AR
dc.subjectUSAeng
dc.subjectEUAes_AR
dc.subjectGenetic Resources Conservationeng
dc.subjectConservación de Recursos Genéticoses_AR
dc.subject.otherCreole Cattleeng
dc.subject.otherGanado Criolloes_AR
dc.titleGenetic and productive background of Criollo cattle in Argentina, Mexico, Uruguay and the United Stateses_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenInstituto de Genéticaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Armstrong, Eileen. Universidad de la República. Facultad de Veterinaria. Unidad Académica Genética y Mejora Animal. Departamento de Producción Animal; Uruguayes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Rodriguez Almeida, Felipe A. Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua. Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología; Méxicoes_AR
dc.description.filFil: McIntosh, Matthew. New Mexico State University. Department of Animal and Range Sciences; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Poli, Mario Andres. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Instituto de Genética; Argentinaes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Cibils, Andrés Francisco. New Mexico State University. Department of Animal and Range Sciences; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.description.filFil: Martínez-Quintana, José Alfredo. Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua. Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología; Méxicoes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Félix-Portillo, Monserrath. Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua. Facultad de Zootecnia y Ecología; Méxicoes_AR
dc.description.filFil: Estell, Richard E. United States Department of Agriculture. Agricultural Research Service. Jornada Experimental Range; Estados Unidoses_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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