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Abstract
Greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant livestock production systems contribute significantly to the environmental footprint of agriculture. Emissions are lower for feedlot systems than for grass-based systems primarily because of the extra time required for grass-finished cattle to reach slaughter weight. In contrast, legume forages are of greater quality than grasses, which enhances intake and food conversion efficiencies, leading to improvements in [ver mas...]
dc.contributor.authorLagrange, Sebastian Pablo
dc.contributor.authorMacAdam, Jennifer W.
dc.contributor.authorVillalba, Juan J.
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-30T13:18:30Z
dc.date.available2021-11-30T13:18:30Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-09
dc.identifier.issn2073-4395
dc.identifier.otherhttps://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11112264
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12123/10805
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.mdpi.com/2073-4395/11/11/2264/html
dc.description.abstractGreenhouse gas emissions from ruminant livestock production systems contribute significantly to the environmental footprint of agriculture. Emissions are lower for feedlot systems than for grass-based systems primarily because of the extra time required for grass-finished cattle to reach slaughter weight. In contrast, legume forages are of greater quality than grasses, which enhances intake and food conversion efficiencies, leading to improvements in production and reductions in environmental impacts compared with forage grasses. In addition, the presence of certain bioactives in legumes such as condensed tannins (CT) enhance the efficiency of energy and protein use in ruminants relative to grasses and other feeds and forages. Grazing tannin-containing legumes also reduce the incidence of bloat and improve meat quality. Synergies among nutrients and bioactives when animals graze diverse legume pastures have the potential to enhance these benefits. Thus, a diversity of legumes in feeding systems may lead to more economically, environmentally, and socially sustainable beef production than grass monocultures or feedlot rations.eng
dc.formatapplication/pdfes_AR
dc.language.isoenges_AR
dc.publisherMDPIes_AR
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_AR
dc.sourceAgronomy 11 (11) : 2264 (2021)es_AR
dc.subjectRumiantees_AR
dc.subjectRuminantseng
dc.subjectLegumonosas Forrajerases_AR
dc.subjectFeed Legumeseng
dc.subjectAgricultura Sosteniblees_AR
dc.subjectSustainable Agricultureeng
dc.subjectTaninoses_AR
dc.subjectTanninseng
dc.subjectMedicago Sativaes_AR
dc.subjectOnobrychis Viciifoliaes_AR
dc.subjectLotus Corniculatuses_AR
dc.subjectEmisiones de Metanoes_AR
dc.subjectMethane Emissioneng
dc.subjectAlfalfa
dc.titleThe Use of Temperate Tannin Containing Forage Legumes to Improve Sustainability in Forage–Livestock Productiones_AR
dc.typeinfo:ar-repo/semantics/artículoes_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_AR
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersiones_AR
dc.description.origenEEA Bordenavees_AR
dc.description.filFil: Lagrange, Sebastian Pablo. Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria (INTA). Estación Experimental Agropecuaria Bordenave; Argentina.es_AR
dc.description.filFil: MacAdam, Jennifer W. Utah State University. College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences; Estados Unidos.es_AR
dc.description.filFil: Villalba, Juan J. Utah State University. Quinney College of Natural Resources. Department of Wildland Resources; Estados Unidos.es_AR
dc.subtypecientifico


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